Browsing All Posts filed under »Architecture«

Once Upon a Geodesic Dome

September 19, 2010

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A few weeks back I helped a friend construct a geodesic dome for an islamic art workshop at the V&A in London. There are various ways of triangulating a dome or sphere (I believe the Bucky method produced a dome entirely of equilaterals) and I was not responsible for the calculations in this instance but […]

Pink and Green

June 23, 2010

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Contrary to popular belief multicoloured balconies are not some kind of definitive answer to designing social housing. Just as multicoloured fins are not all you need for an award winning office façade. It would seem that a multitude of ears perked up when somebody suggested that fluorescent colours might improve our collective disposition. Is this […]

Rural British Architecture – The Crisis

June 15, 2010

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In my opinion there is a national (at the least) crisis in rural and sub-rural architecture. At some point in time we must have completely lost our way to reach our current, bleak, standpoint. The problem that I am referring to is encapsulated and realised in new housing developments just outside of towns all over […]

Reading Ruskin

April 30, 2010

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I’m currently reading John Ruskin’s ‘The Stones of Venice’. Naturally, I skipped straight to the famous essay, ‘The Nature of Gothic’. I’m sure I will write a more conclusive post on the essay but until then something worth considering: Ruskin observes that Architecture is not received by the public with the same excitement of, say, […]

Djenné – Behind the Facade

April 6, 2010

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Another talk on Djenne, this time by Charlotte Joy, an anthropologist at Cambridge, offering something quite different to the architectural perspective I have occupied so far. The many talks I have been to invariably open with an introduction on Mali, where it is etc, as one tends to to avoid any presumption of knowledge. Immediately […]

Djenné and Sustainability

March 21, 2010

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When analysing mud building, the fact that the construction footprint (including transport of materials) is little bigger than the footprint of the site itself is surely the pinnacle of sustainable construction. In Djenné the buildings are predominantly flat roofed, wooden beams spanning the mud walls, covered with mud. With the source of wood being the […]

Djenné

March 20, 2010

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Djenné (jen-nay) is a settlement in the West African country of Mali. Situated on the river Niger, which provides both life and constraints. Every year the river floods, something that is an integral part of the town’s yearly eco-cycle. Djenné is positioned in such a way that when the river does flood it becomes almost […]